The Anne of All Trades Blog: Tool Reviews

Minimizing Dust and Maximizing Filter Life

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

I have had an older model of this same Ridgid vacuum in my shop since the beginning. They were hardy, affordable, and had a lifetime guarantee. For a broke wanna be woodworker trying to build up my shop, that’s all I could ask for in a tool. I’ve still got that vacuum and it’s kept my shop clean and played dust collector like a champion for 7 years, and I couldn’t ask any more of a tool.

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So when it came time to test the Ridgid 16 Gallon 6.5 HP vacuum for this review, I was pretty well versed with what I’d be getting, a great tool for a great value. This thing boasts the best CFM in it’s class. The new nozzle clips keep the hose and attachments from detaching unexpectedly, which is a brilliant answer to one of my biggest frustrations when cleaning the shop. At 16 gallons, this is still technically a “portable” tool, but if I was regularly moving it around the jobsite, and not just pulling it around my smooth concrete shop floor, I might be inclined to get a smaller model.

As is the case with most shop vacuums, this model has a blower, but I never use the blower (on purpose at least, there was one unfortunate incident where I had the hoses hooked up wrong and accidentally blew dust all over the shop I’d just spent two hours meticulously cleaning… we will just attribute that incident to an extreme lack of sleep).

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The one thing I don’t love about this tool is it’s cloth storage pouch. It does hold all the attachments, but I think it looks kind of sloppy and, it being cloth, it collects dirt and dust just like you might expect a cloth bag on top of a dust and trash receptacle would. Another feature I would really, really like on a shop vacuum would be an automatic cord reel. The wrap provided works, but isn’t my favorite design. Another thing I would really love to see less of on this tool is plastic. That said, I also understand the manufacturing process, and alternative construction materials would increase the cost of the unit significantly. 

This vacuum retails for $159. Would I buy it?

Absolutely, I have been using a similar Ridgid vac in my shop for 7 years.

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What about the Dustopper attachment?

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Retailing for $40, the Dustopper is Home Depot’s answer to the Dust Deputy, which retails for $50. I have both, and both are good products. I wouldn’t use either on my every day vacuum that I drag around the shop while I clean because they are cumbersome and the Dustopper bucket tends to tip over a lot, but on a stationary tool hooked up to the vacuum, they are MAJOR filter savers. When the Dustopper is attached, the majority of the dust and debris  falls directly into the 5 gallon bucket beneath it, and very little material goes into the vacuum. I use it most on my chopsaw and oscillating spindle sander because those fine particulates are enemy No. 1 of my vacuum filters. Without an auxillary product, all that fine dust clogs the filter and the vacuum loses CFM really quickly. The thing I like most about the dustopper is it’s low profile. It fits under my chop saw like a glove. I actually bought the dust deputy to live under that cabinet, but it didn’t fit, so I was really glad to find another option that worked.

Posted on October 26, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Reviewing the Bosch BLAZE 165' Laser Tape

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

I am a huge fan of this tool’s little brother, the GLM 42 135 ft Laser Measure, and I reviewed it in July (click here to read it).  This model, the GLM 50, costs an extra $20, retailing for $119. It offers an additional 30’ of accurate measurements (165’ digital tape) and Bluetooth capability so you can use the tool in conjunction with your cell phone on the Bosch Measure app, giving you greater storage capacity and versatility using this tool. Those are the only two differences between this tool and the GLM 42, so this review will be pretty short, as I’ve sung the GLM 42’s praises quite loudly here before.

Probably the coolest feature that comes with the Bluetooth capabilities of this tool is the ability to overlay your digital measurements onto photos.  For a visual person like myself, that is a really awesome concept. That said though, I’m not super tech savvy and the app is a tad cumbersome to use. I really like the GLM 42, and if it were up to me I’d just buy a GLM 42 and save my extra $20.

If you’re keen on gadgets and cool features though, and are patient enough to learn and work with the app, the cool factor on this tool is extremely high. The GLM app allows you to create floor plans from within the app. You can do real-time measurements, tack those to photos of the space, and you get an increased storage capacity by integrating with the app. The tool will calculate length, area, volume, and can measure/calculate angles and perform addition and subtraction calculations.

Posted on October 25, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Finally, a Fantastic Battery Powered Router!

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

Ever since I first used this tool in a Makita booth at a show last year, I knew I had to have it. I actually really don’t use routers very often in my woodshop, something that I didn’t think was weird until I started hanging out with other woodworkers who do. I’ve always been annoyed by their high pitched squeal and the huge mess they make. But the release of a battery powered tool I can use outside? Game changer. First of all, I’ve had the majority of my tools on the Makita platform for most of the past seven years. While I have recently been wooed by some of the new releases from Milwaukee, Makita has been making tools that are a solid investment for far longer than I’ve been using tools.

This cordless router is no exception. It is compact and lightweight. The blade housing/fence mechanism is easy to adjust and remove for quick blade changes. It’s not going to have the same battery life as, say, a drill, even the 4ah batteries, but that is not really a surprise, especially considering what kind of power it takes to actually cut wood. The saving grace is the fact that this tool runs on brushless motor, which is electrically controlled from within to meet changing demands with regard to torque and speed. Run time will depend on the type of wood, the type of bit, and the depth of cut. Makita’s new batteries also have juice gauges on the actual battery, so you can monitor your battery useage easily. A quick aside on the batteries- that life-indicator is amazing. I can’t even tell you how many times I’ve carried a handful of batteries out to the jobsite only to stick them in my tool and realize they were dead. It’s a long, frustrating walk back from the forest or the pasture when I do that, so I really, really dig the new indicator feature.

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There are only a couple buttons on this tool. There’s a dial to control the speed and a lock/unlock safety switch to turn it on. It has been a little tricky getting used to the button placement, especially since they are so small, but I’m sure that will come in time.

If there was one design feature I would love, it would be to have a spot on the tool that the wrenches could tuck into. On my corded routers, I always attach the wrenches to the end of the cord and then I never lose them. On a cordless router, no such luck.

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This tool retails for $130. Would I buy it?

Though a few other companies have made cordless routers, Makita was the first company making tools for the professional to come out with a true knockout tool. At $130, I’d say it’s a reasonably priced router, and I would definitely buy it. That said, if you were new to the Makita platform, the addition of the battery and charger at $149 would make this a much tougher pill to swallow- I might actually think twice about dragging out the extension cords and waiting for a brushless, cordless tool on your battery platform.

Batteries always seem to be the major killer when it comes to tool pricing, which is the main argument for picking one tool company and sticking with it. Not to mention, it’s a pain juggling 10 different chargers and their cords. I don’t take it lightly that this tool testing gig affords me the opportunity to use so many different tools and brand platforms, because it’s taught me so much about how tools actually work and it’s taught me to become a far more discerning customer. It also allows me to really use and abuse the tools and pick my favorites. I can only hope that that translates well into honest, helpful reviews for readers. This Makita router is definitely one of my favorite tools I’ve used this year. The fact that Makita has such a diverse product line is also a big argument to love the company- their battery operated chainsaw and lightweight circular saw get used on the daily around the farm.

 

Posted on October 25, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Testing the Dremel Multi-Max

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

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Ok, let’s talk about this oscillating tool and it’s attachments. I tested the Multi-Max itself, $129, the Universal Oscillating Tool Accessory kit for Wood, Metal and Drywall, $29.97 and the Cutting and Variety Accessory kit for Wood, Metal and Drywall, $29.97.

Dremel really knocked this one out of the park- the only thing that could have made this tool better (for me at least) would be adding battery power. Having used the corded Milwaukee, Dewalt, and Fein iterations of this tool extensively, the Dremel really takes the cake. Here are my favorite points:

 -There is significantly less vibration of the tool when in use.

-Lighting fast blade changes with no extra tools.

-The locking mechanism on the head of the tool is easy to use and doesn’t accidentally come loose, a huge plus with the safety conscious.

-The kit comes with pretty much everything you’d  need for the first few projects you’d tackle with the tool.

-The fact that you can reposition the blade at an angle to get into tight spots is also a major bonus.

-The tool is lightweight, comfortable to hold and to use, the ergonomics are solid.

-The blades cut quickly and really seem to last well

-Competitively Priced

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While this tool is a breeze to use, there are a few things only longterm use will prove- I wonder how the blade locking mechanism I like so much will handle getting gunked up from prolonged use around the jobsite (read, what happens when the donkeys kick a whole pile of woodchips and manure on it while they casually walk by?) My other main concern is with the accessories for the tool. While the tool itself is fairly affordable, the Dremel branded attachments are somewhat less budget friendly, but they are also performing better than some of the competitors’ attachments, so it may all be a wash. As it is, I just so happened to be doing a ton of renovation and construction projects this quarter, so this tool saw some heavy use in my metal shop project as well as the chicken coop project. It got dirty it got slightly abused, and it’s performed incredibly well despite it all. It’s quieter, vibrates less than the two other tools I’ve been using the last few years and blade changes are a breeze- this tool is a real win for Dremel.

Posted on October 23, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Fancy Fencing with Ryobi

Reviewing the Ryobi One 18V Shears

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

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 I’ve been singing Makita’s praises for providing so many helpful farm implements on their battery powered platforms for years. Ryobi has provided me with two GAME CHANGER tools on their battery platform this year- first, with the 40v Weed Whacker (don’t even get me STARTED on the frustrations of dealing with small engines around the farm in the Seattle rain), now with these shears.  When stringing fence, these things were the handiest tool I’ve come across in a WHILE. We use 2”x4” galvanized  livestock wire all over the farm. These Ryobi shears whiz right through the stuff. I used to snip every single wire individually, which is extremely time consuming and makes for a major hand-ache. This tool has single-handedly cut fencing time and frustration in half.

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These shears are also geared well toward cutting sheet metal, but I’ll be honest, figuring out the proper jaw angle and width for the tool to work properly is a bit tough. If cutting sheet metal was my main goal, I’d be inclined to look at other options.

This tool retails for $79. Would I buy it?

This tool is yet another instance of the battery costing more than the tool itself, but, especially for those caring for any amount of property, between the weed whacker and these shears, these tools have more than proved their value around the farm and I’d recommend both highly.

The 18V 6 AH Battery on the Ryobi platform really packs a punch. I use it in my weedwhacker and get an amazing life out of it. The power indicator on the front of the battery is great because I can always check and make sure I’ve got juice before carrying it out to the jobsite. As is the case with every battery platform though, it’s pricey, so make sure you’ve got enough tools you’re running on it to make sure you get your money’s worth.

To see this tool in action, check out my YouTube video on building the Chicken coop:

Posted on October 22, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Getting Organized with DeWalt

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

This won’t likely come as a surprise to many in my audience, but I’m a bit of a hoarder. I’m sure I’ve always had it in me, but something about living on the farm has really brought it out. The longer I spend living on a farm, the better I’ve gotten at thinking quickly on my feet and solving problems on the fly. When so many things can be fixed with haybale twine, scrap wood and pipes I just find laying around, it’s no surprise it’s getting increasingly difficult to part with anything that is more obviously useful like boxes of nails and screws, of which I’ve amassed quite the collection.

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These Dewalt small parts organizers came at just the right time. Doing so many construction projects around the farm this summer; working on the tiny house, the chicken coop, and the metal shop, I was always running back to the house for this or that. I was able to dump a huge collection of assorted boxes of stuff which were formerly clogging the entire surface of my workbench into the organizers in a very (you guessed it) organized fashion. I created an “outdoor construction” box with deck screws, metal roofing screws, fence staples, and other assorted items which I can easily pack to the worksite all together and save myself a few extra trips back to the shop.

 In the large organizer, the cups come out individually, so you can grab whatever you need and shut the box to prevent accidental spills and moisture. The small parts organizer has moveable partitions which allow the user to create custom sized compartments.

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When all is said and done, the organizers can be clipped together and tossed out of the way. The clear tops make for easy location of different parts. These also incorporate seamlessly with Dewalt’s pack-out system, but these are pretty useful to me as an independent unit.

 These organizers retail for $30: Would I buy them?

 Absolutely. I love that they are stackable, giving endless opportunity for more organization. At this pricepoint, they are sturdy, versatile, and they got a load of crud off my workbench.

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Posted on October 21, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Husky LED Lights Review

This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

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My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not an expert… anything really. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

Ok let’s talk lights: The Husky 200 Lumen LED Magnetic Clip Light $9.97, The 200 Lumen LED Magnetic Hook Light $9.97 (I like to call it a puck light), and the Husky 300 Lumen LED Dual Beam Aluminum Headlight $14.97.

I’ll be honest, at first glance, I made a snap judgment that these lights were just going to be another thing knocking around in the bottom of a drawer somewhere, but I tossed them in my work bag to put them to the test and was shocked at just how often they’ve come in handy. As I’ve mentioned many times, I spend a lot of time working around the farm where there are no power cords. I also have a bad habit of working really late at night, so extra light is usually a huge plus. I have and love the 18v Milwaukee work light, but it doesn’t fit in my work bag and can’t sneak into tight spots for directional lighting.

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It’s important to remember that, especially with tools, you get what you pay for, and Husky definitely does appeal far more to the homeowner and the contractor looking for a good deal than to those making lifetime tool investments, but I really appreciate that Husky backs up their brand with solid warranty and replacement plans. While Husky tools had a noticeable dip in quality several years ago, the brand has made a lot of strides over the past two years to really kick up their product lines and production standards, so if you haven’t used any of their recent tools, I think they are definitely worth a second look.

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These little Husky lights are compact, bright, and have a decent battery life considering the amount of light they are putting out. The magnetic puck clicks onto car hoods, hangs on nails, and provides great directional lighting in tight spaces. The magnetic clip light has a little pull-out stand, and can be set on the floor and angled directly at the area you need to light up. Though I hate wearing headlamps, it’s often the only option when climbing around in rafters, something I’ve been spending quite a bit of time doing lately. The headlamp is comfortable, has four modes- spot, flood, both, and a flashing red light. The incorporation of the reflective backing on the battery pack expands the useability of this light outside the jobsite to biking, hiking, or camping. The lights all have rubber casing, with the intention of giving added protection for drops. The clip lights have Phillips head screws on the battery pack, and while I hate having to grab another tool to change batteries, it is nice that when the lights do get dropped or knocked over, the batteries don’t go flying in ten different directions.

Since I’m planning on keeping these little lights in my work bag, always at the ready, I went ahead and invested in some rechargeable batteries. The lights come with batteries to get you started, but they only had about a three hour run-time on those batteries. I just feel better knowing I’m not running through and disposing of a whole lot of batteries over the life of these tools.

Would I buy these tools?

These three lights have earned a long-term spot in my tool bag, because they shed much needed light in tight spaces and have a small footprint in my toolbag. For under $35, it’s a small investment with big rewards.

That magnetic puck light especially, for $10 is pure awesome. I’ve used it all over the farm, working on my old farm truck, and it now lives on the fridge in my metal shop, ready to grab whenever needed.

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Posted on October 8, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Husky 9 Drawer Workbench Review

This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

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My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional mechanic. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to working on cars, construction, framing, electrical and home renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

So let’s talk about this Husky 9 Drawer Workbench:

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Organization has always been a huge struggle for me. Part of my creative process involves a major explosion of all the tools and supplies I own. Logically speaking, I know that cleanliness and organization are the keys to productivity and efficiency, but somehow, despite my best intentions, I’m a tornado in my own space. One way to stave of the hurricane, however, is to make sure everything has it’s place.

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This bench is a real winner. It looks sleek, it’s got a solid base, and it provides an enormous amount of storage, which, for me at least, was a huge step in the right direction.

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Awesome features:

·      Strong drawers

·      Drawers extend fully, and offer full support even when fully extended

·      Bottom drawers offer tons of storage

·      The built in power strip is awesome

·      The handle on the side makes for easy relocation even when fully loaded

·      Comes with grip mats which protect tools and keep them from slipping around

·      The paint holds up well and the welds and fasteners are all solid

Things I wish were better/different:

·      I wish the wheels were made of rubber rather, would be more durable and have better non-slip capabilities

·      The benchtop doesn’t seem super durable. It’s replaceable, but I don’t want to have to replace it. It’s easily damaged by solvents and dents/scratches easily

This bench retails for $309. Would I buy it?

If you’ve got stacks of tools and supplies clogging up your workspace, you owe it to yourself to get organized. If adding more drawer space and another work surface can help you get there, you’d be hard pressed to find a better bench at this price point.

Posted on October 4, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Milwaukee 18V Brushless Drill/Driver Set

This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

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My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

So let’s talk about this month’s MAJOR TOOL CRUSH, the Milwaukee M18 FUEL 18-Volt Lithium-Ion Brushless Cordless Hammer Drill & Impact Driver Combo Kit (2-Tool) w/(2) 5Ah Batteries.

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This kit, though a big initial investment is a fantastic value. I paid a little less for my (other brand) 18V drill/driver kit a few years ago and they served me well, but now having used several of Milwaukee’s tools on their 12v and 18v battery platforms, I’m making the switch to Milwaukee everywhere it makes sense. Their battery-powered grinders are nice, the flood/spot light comes in extremely handy, and the random orbital sander has earned its spot in my traveling farm tools bag. I’ve been slinging these tools around the farm, in the shop, and around the tiny house build for the past six months and I love them.

“There is a $179 version of this kit on sale this weekend at Home Depot. What makes these different? As a weekend warrior, do I need the more expensive kit?”

The biggest difference is that the drill motors in these cheaper options are not brushless. As I was trying to find the right words on how to explain the difference between brushless and standard drill motors, I found this awesome article in Popular Mechanics that explains it way better than I could. Will the weekend warrior ever be able to tell the difference between a brushless and non brushless motor? That is debatable, but the real difference between the two kits, at least for me, is the 5ah batteries that come in the more expensive kit. I was a little worried that the 5ah batteries would make the tools a tad too heavy, but that hasn’t been the case. The battery life is great and the weight is surprisingly low considering the power and amp hours available.

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 As I tend to do, I’ve used the drill and driver for a few unconventional applications, and they performed exceedingly well. I got a lot of flack for using the ½” driver with a paddle to mix my drywall mud for the tiny house, but it worked like a charm, and since I didn’t have power cords at the build site this time around, it genuinely was the only option available. The hammer drill has loosened quite a few rusty nuts around the farm (I’m still curious as to why the previous farm owner used assorted sized nuts and bolts SO frequently in the place of regular screws and nails). It’s drilled quite a few holes because it was the handiest option and I happened to have square drive drill bits.

 I used the drill and driver quite a bit in my shavehorse build, installing the subfloor, drywall, steel roofing and concrete board in the tiny house, as I was shoring up the roof of the metal shop, and on the chicken coop build, and I’ve found zero complaints thus far.

Awesome Features on the Hammer Drill:

·      Light and compact- allows for access to tight spaces while still delivering surprising power

·      ½” chuck expands the applications of the tool significantly

·      Variable speed trigger

·      2 speed gearbox, 1200 lbs of torque

Awesome Features on the Impact Driver:

·      Single handed bit insert on the ¼” hex chuck

·      Self-tapping screw function for metal roofing screws

These tools retail for $379. Would I buy them?

Absolutely. It is definitely an investment, but a valid one, especially if you’re already on the Milwaukee battery platform. If you’re not, I’d strongly encourage you to look at the brushless options within your current battery platform before making the investment. The Ridgid and Makita brushless drill/driver kits are also really great options.

 





Posted on October 2, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Review Roundup: Ridgid MEGAMax, Bosch Paddle Bits, Diablo Recip Blades

This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

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My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to construction, framing, electrical and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

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First- let’s chat about Bosch Spade/Paddle bits:

On products like these, I like to run an initial test, and then report back after months or even years of hard use on how they hold up. I put these to the test drilling holes in a walnut scrap board to create lathe chisel organization, interested to see how quickly they cut and how bad the blowout would be on a semi hard wood like walnut without a backer board. The brand new bits cut cleanly and quickly and there was minimal blowout.

I tried again making a hanger hole on a walnut cutting board with similarly acceptable results. Obviously, without a backer board, a little blowout is inevitable, but it was pretty minimal, certainly better than other paddle bits I’ve used, and easily fixed with a router and roundover bit, a step I was intending to do regardless.

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The real test though was the hundred++ holes drilled in the studs of the tiny house as we ran electrical wire. The bits held up great even as they heated up from use.

Any time you’re using threaded paddle bits, you’ve got to be careful because the bits have a major tendency to want to grab in the wood and take your arm for a ride, and those can be real (literal) wrist breakers. The safest way to use the bits in a hand held driver is to cradle the driver against your torso while drilling so if it does grab, there’s a stop. Better to get the wind knocked out of you a bit than to snap your arm.

The manufacturer claims the full thread tip, the contoured paddle design and spur and reamer tips allow the bit to cut 10x faster than a conventional paddle bit. While my tests aren’t nearly scientific enough to assign a number to the increased cutting speed, it is definitely noticeable.

These bits retail for $19.99. Would I buy them? Absolutely. They are a great value for the dollar. They cut fast and clean and should have a significantly longer lifespan than their similarly priced “competitors” which aren’t worth the steel they are produced with.

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The coolest feature of the Ridgid MEGAMax is that you can switch from drilling function to cutting function by switching out the heads. After the holes were drilled for electrical in the tiny house, we switched to the reciprocating saw head and in went the Diablo blades.

 I’ll be honest, testing these Diablo recip-saw blades couldn’t have come at a better time…

because between doing demo work in my metal shop, working on the Tiny House, and building a chicken coop, I had more use for a reciprocating saw these past three months than ever before in my life. These blades have actually held up shockingly well, though having used and abused Diablo blades in most of my tools since I started building seven years ago, I shouldn’t be surprised. I’ve said before and will say again that Diablo blades are my go-to blades because of price point and durability. I don’t have much more to say about them aside from the fact that I made it through all three builds with just three blades- no small feat. Most of the recip saw work I was doing wasn’t in clean, fresh wood, it was in heavily nail and bolt infused boards. The only time I actually had to replace blades was when I kinked them from trying to cut too close into a corner (which happened twice and I have the busted knuckles to prove it).

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So now let’s talk about the Ridgid MEGAMax, the Reciprocating Saw Attachment, the Rotary Hammer Attachment, the Right Angle Drill Attachment, and the Ridgid 18v 6AH Octane Battery System.

  • My favorite features at a glance:

  • Trigger lock for continuous use

  • Customizeable head placement

  • Cordless Rotary Hammer Drill attachment

  • Variable speed trigger

  • Safety lock

  • Easy blade change twist lock on the recip saw attachment

  • LED light illuminates dark working conditions

Ridgid toes the line between providing tools for personal and professional use really well. This tool is a perfect example of that. You’re getting WAY more power out of a tool like this than, say, an 18v drill motor, but I’d also argue that this is one of those tools that is far better suited for a professional user. It’s powerful, but that power from a battery operated unit comes at a pretty big price- the weight of the tool. There are a lot of places on the farm I need tons of power but I can’t get electricity, so this tool has come in extremely handy when I needed to drill bracket holes in pier blocks, secure locking bolts in concrete while building barn stalls, etc. Using a rotohammer to drill concrete without a cord is a pretty incredible thing. The right angle drilling attachment is a nice feature, but again, one probably far better suited to the professional user rather than a weekend warrior or DIYer. I don’t really love the reciprocating saw attachment. Not because it’s not quality, but simply because most of the reciprocating saw use for my projects is done on ladders at awkward angles, and often above my head. I’m pretty strong for my size, but even for me, that weight is pretty tough to wield away from my body or above my head for any length of time at all.

 

Plus, with the incredible power you’re getting from the newer, smaller 18v single purpose tools in the Ridgid toolkit, (like my favorite battery powered recip saw) there are few operations I can think of the average homeowner facing that this tool would be better suited to accomplish. All that said though, if you are already on Ridgid’s battery system and you want to invest in a multi-tool with monster power, I think this is a solid investment. One of the things that really sets this multi-tool apart from its competitors is the inclusion of the new Ridgid Octane battery technology. The tool is able to communicate with the battery depending on which head you are using so the battery can deliver the proper amount of power for that particular head. Pretty mind blowing stuff. Along with the ability to replace the heads of the MEGAMax depending on which operations you’d like to complete, you can also change the orientation of each of the heads for maximum comfort and convenience in use. That comes in handy when trying to get into tough spots and when working at weird angles.

SO. With all that in mind, the bare tool with three heads retails for $287.00 Add a 6ah Battery ($129) and Charger ($79) and you’re looking at $495. Would I buy it?

If I was already on the Ridgid battery system and I had need for battery powered rotary hammer, (which I was and I did), I’d buy the bare tool and rotary hammer attachment at a much easier to swallow $218 price point. If I were looking at starting fresh with the Ridgid system just for this one tool, and didn’t have a specific project in mind for it’s use, I’d definitely say the average weekend warrior would be much happier investing in a brushless drill/driver combo kit (I like this one on the Ridgid battery System, and this one on the Milwaukee battery system) and smaller, dedicated reciprocating saw (read my review on the Ridgid here).

 

 

Posted on September 30, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Extreme Accuracy with Bosch

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot. 

My first order of business with this and every power tool review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to construction and renovation projects, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. That said, I doubt many professional contractors will be reading my tool reviews. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

This laser tape is the bees knees, and I think it should be another staple in every homeowner’s toolkit. There are a lot of bells and whistles to this tool that have made it especially useful for me. I’ve talked a lot about the frustrations I’ve faced with my dyslexia and apparent inability to use a measuring tape efficiently. The numbers get jumbled in my head and I always seem to forget I’ve burned an inch, then my boards end up too short.

The first project this tool came in handy on was measuring for trim on my shop build. Nothing in that whole place is square, and there’s not even one place in the whole shop where I’ll be able to put in a solid run of trim, but the digital bubble level assured me I was taking precise measurements and nothing was getting longer or shorter because of a bowed tape. I saved each measurement and it CALCULATED THE LINEAR FEET of trim I needed for the whole project automatically. That right there sealed my love affair with this tool.

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It can also calculate square footage for flooring, wall material, and paint. It can calculate volume (hello well maintenance on the farm!!), calculate pathagrean theorem (a2+b2=c2) to get the length of roofing material needed on a pitched roof, and for that matter, can also calculate pitch, slope, and angles, and might just be the ticket I desperately needed to stop making gross miscalculations on the jobsite.

I was also able to use it for site prep on the tiny house, measure trees and branch heights when choosing the exact location for the tiny house, as well as planning my means of attack when demolishing the old shed at the tiny house build site.

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The only limitation of this tool is that it requires a stop point to be able to measure distances accurately, so in instances where you’d hook the tape to measure something, you’re still tied to using a tape- at least for now. There are, of course, workarounds, you could tack up a stop block for the laser to register against, but sometimes it takes more work to be lazy than to just do things the old fashioned way. 

Awesome Features:

·      Takes precise measurements in tough to reach spots

·      Calculates angles, run, distance, pitch, square footage, volume and more

·      Built-in memory storage

·      Calculates linear feet needed for specific operations

·      Also functions as a level

·      Has 1/4/20 thread so it can be mounted on standard clamps and tripods

Things I wish were better/different:

·      It’s weird to me that you can’t set it to read 16th’s of an inch, only 32nd’s. In instances where I’d be using this level, it seems like 16th’s are more than adequate.

This retails for $99.97 Would I buy it?

Absolutely. The money/time/headaches I’ll save doing the trim and flooring in the shop and tiny house would pay for it three times over.

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.

 

Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Building a Tiny House with a Cordless Saw

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

These are the tools April and I used to build a Tiny House in 7 days.

These are the tools April and I used to build a Tiny House in 7 days.

My first order of business with this and every power tool review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to construction and renovation projects, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. That said, I doubt many professional contractors will be reading my tool reviews. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

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For the past several years, I have been using an 18v Makita circular saw when corded power wasn’t available. It was great for little jobs around the farm, in fact, during the tiny house build, we used it quite a bit as a backup saw so both of us could be working simultaneously. I didn’t realize just how underpowered it was, however, until I spent some time using the Dewalt 60v brushless circular saw. The Dewalt moves through wood differently than the Makita, so it took a bit of getting used to, but it worked like a charm after that.  One cool thing I noticed as I was using it is that the handle position is set in such a way that your pointer finger points directly in line with your cut, just like it should when using a handsaw.

The next thing that really jumped out at me about the saw was the battery life. We used this saw for every single cut during the first three days of framing out the tiny house. Because I wanted to see how long the battery would last, I didn’t bring the battery up to charge at the end of the first workday since it was still going strong. It ended up lasting until the fourth day on the jobsite and made several hundred cuts (2x4’s, 2x6’s, sheathing) until it finally died and we had to put it on the charger.

The Diablo blades we used on the jobsite cut through anything we threw their way like butter. In my experience both in the woodshop and on the jobsite, Diablo blades are the best blade you can buy at a big box store. Of course, if you go to specialty saw shops and supply yards, you can get into blades that will leave a razor thin kerf and last unreal amounts of time, but you’ll also pay an unreal price for them. Diablo has proven, for me at least, to be the best value for my dollar both in quality and durability, and I don’t have to add an extra stop to my errands list to buy them.

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We had a 24 tooth framing blade loaded up in the circular saw for the whole build the thin kerf was great in stretching our wood further, and, at least in theory, that thin blade is lighter, so it would spin faster in the saw making a more efficient cut and saving on battery life. I’m not enough of a scientist or mathematician to prove that, but did I mention that the battery lasted FOR FOUR DAYS? The only point of interest on that framing blade is that it didn’t have carbide teeth- that makes it more affordable, but I’m curious about the durability, and will have to report back on that after a few more months of use. So far? Very impressed. Allegedly, the blade can also hold up to a few nail hits as well, but I’m thankful to report we didn’t have any of those during this build.

Manufacturer claims:

·      Designed with blade oriented to the left of the motor and handle positioned at the rear of the saw for easy line sight

·      Saw has an electronic brake that helps the blade stop after the trigger is released

·      Bevel capacity of 53 with stops at 25 and 45

·      5x longer cutting life versus standard blades

·      2x increased durability in nail-embedded wood applications

·      65% more efficient in corded and cordless saws

Awesome Features I discovered while using it:

·      INFINITE BATTERY LIFE (ok, a tad over-exaggerated there, but it’s really good)

·      Powerful- feels like a corded tool

·      Brushless motor is quiet, starts up and shuts down quickly

·      Shut-off brake

·      Battery position: centered in tool to evenly distribute weight.

·      Big lettering on depth and angle gauges are easy to read

·      Wrench slot on tool- changing blades on the fly doesn’t require an hour-long search for the right wrench.

Things I wish were better/different:

·      You pay for the power and battery life when it comes to the weight. It’s very heavy.

This saw retails for $399.00. Would I buy it at full price?

ABSOLUTELY. During the tiny house project, this tool became an instant favorite. It’s rugged, durable, powerful, and will easily tackle jobs all over the homestead where I don’t have access to corded power.

This blade retails for $9.97. Would I buy it at full price?

Once again, a hearty yes- I’ve been buying and using Diablo blades for all my tools for years.

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.

Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under DIY and Home Renovation, Tool Reviews.

On the Level with Bosch

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every tool review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to construction and renovation projects, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. That said, I doubt many professional contractors will be reading my tool reviews. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

This is a fairly inexpensive tool I think every homeowner should have. It doesn’t have a lot of bells or whistles, but it’s easy to set up and use. A laser level and a tape measure completely remove any need for a homeowner to have bubble levels. Whether you’re hanging pictures

I used this laser level for two very different projects: renovating a broken down, rotting building as I converted it into my dream woodworking shop, and building an off-grid tiny house in the woods on our property.

In the shop build, the level came in extremely handy while we were installing my LED lighting system. We would set the level, wire up the first light in the run, then use the laser line as a guide hanging each of the five subsequent lights in the line. Because it was such an old building, nothing was square, so if we were to measure from one wall or another, the lights would have ended up appearing crooked, and we would have spent a whole heck of a lot more time measuring and marking the proper setup than simply setting the laser and forgetting it. The floor in the shop is also really un-level (I’m talking potential derby-race levels of un-levelness), so the self-leveling feature of the tool was really crucial.

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The tiny house was the first “large-scale” construction project (yes, I hear the irony in that statement even as I make it) I’ve ever tackled from the very beginning. The first, and most important step in the build was site prep. When setting the concrete piers and hangers, everything had to be square and level to start, or the whole rest of the build would have been a marking and measuring nightmare. Because we were in the middle of the forest, the ground was really un-level, so once again, that self-leveling feature came in pretty dang handy. We set the laser, compacted the pea gravel, and reset the piers over and over until the horizontal and vertical placement of those two beams was absolutely perfect, and then the framing process began. As I outfit the interior of the tiny house, the level will get a whole lot more use.

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Awesome features:

·      Easy to set up and figure out how to use (important for a tool noob who hates reading instructions like me)

·      Has 1/4/20 thread on the bottom so it can be mounted on an standard clamp, camera tripod, etc.

·      Self-Leveling

·      Battery Powered

·      Cross-line mode projects two very bright lines that are perfectly level.

·      MM2 Flexible Mounting Device clamps to multiple surfaces and provides microfine height adjustment.

·      Smart Pendulum system self-levels and indicates out of level condition. ­

Things I wish were different/better:

·      Because I do so much work outside, I really wish the lasers were even brighter. During the tiny house build, in the shade of the morning, the laser lines were spot on and easy to see, but in the afternoon sun, they became really tough to make out. Bosch actually does make a model with brighter lights, but it’s significantly more expensive.

It retails for $79.97. Would I buy it?

Absolutely.

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.

Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Getting Clean with Dremel Versa

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to home-based projects and renovation, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

Building the Tiny House on a budget, I was really grateful my neighbor offered to give me the windows and sliding glass door they were replacing in their house. They had all sat outside for quite a while though, and had gotten extremely grimey, past the point normal window-washing was effective. I used the power cleaner to excavate and remove that grime and gunk and the whole tiny house instantly looked better. It was especially helpful cleaning the rust out of the plastic tracks in both the windows and door.

Other things I’ve found it useful for: cleaning algae out of watering troughs, cleaning residue off the BBQ lid, deep cleaning the tub and sinks, all jobs at which the Power Cleaner excelled. I think if I spent more time cleaning my house I’d find a whole lot more uses for this specific tool, but since housekeeping duties are generally done by my husband, I found myself wanting to use the tool to remove really stubborn gunk off old tools in the  woodshop, on my old farm truck, on the tractor, and around the farm that this tool simply wasn’t built to handle, which left me really hoping that Dremel will come out with a more powerful cousin to the Power Cleaner soon.

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Basically, what it comes down to is that this is a fantastic maintenance tool, not a restoration tool. It will clean the heck out of your clawfoot tub, but it doesn’t have the power to polish, buff or remove major gunk, and I am not very good at maintenance. I love overhauling stuff, transforming it, dramatic befores and afters, not the in-between, regular care.

Manufacturer messaging:

·      Fastest cleaning tool in the market that does the hard work so you don’t have to

·      Rechargeable lithium-ion battery provides superior and consistent speed to tackle jobs anywhere, holds a charge for 18 months

·      USB adapter charges tool in 2 hours

Awesome Features:

·      The splash guard is a really brilliant addition

·      For scrubbing dishes, tubs, sinks, and stubborn food messes on counters and floors, this is an ideal tool.

Things I wish were better/different:

·      It would be awesome if it was completely water-proof

·      I really love the concept behind this tool, I just wish it had more power so I could put it to work outside the home.

This retails for $49.98. Would I buy it?

As someone who is constantly cleaning gunk off old tools, farm equipment and water troughs, the concept of this tool is amazing and I’d happily pay more for the product if it had more power.

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.

Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Buy Quality Driver Bits

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to construction and renovation projects, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. That said, I doubt many professional contractors will be reading my tool reviews. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

One of the best bits (sorry I can never resist a good pun) of advice my contractor friend Nick has given me is to invest in quality driver bits. I can’t tell you how many Dollar bin multi- tip-packs I’ve gone through over the past few years without really thinking anything of their durability or effectiveness. I invest in quality tools and fasteners, I buy good blades for my saws… so I don’t know why it just never occurred to me that there could be a difference in bits. Now that I’ve seen the light, I’m never going back. These little bits are certainly more expensive on an item-by-item basis compared to the multi-packs, but you are definitely getting what you paid for in both. I like that these Makita bits are gold- they stand out a whole lot better than the grey and black ones I’ve been using in the bottom of my tool bag and when I drop them in the dirt. They are also magnetic, which is a huge plus, since I’m always working at weird angles and trying to do everything one-handed.

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Nick has also been working on converting me to Robertson drive screws, which has reduced the amount of cursing at stripped out heads and broken bits significantly over the past few months- so, Pro-Tip, if you’re not already using them, you should be.

Assorted Pack:

https://homedepot.sjv.io/c/1254293/456723/8154?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.homedepot.com%2Fp%2FMakita-Impact-GOLD-Assorted-2-1-2-in-Steel-Double-Ended-Power-Bits-3-Piece-B-49622%2F206284601

Phillips:

 https://homedepot.sjv.io/c/1254293/456723/8154?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.homedepot.com%2Fp%2FMakita-Impact-GOLD-1-2-1-2-in-Philips-Double-Ended-Power-Bit-3-Piece-B-39578%2F204705982

Torx:

https://homedepot.sjv.io/c/1254293/456723/8154?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.homedepot.com%2Fp%2FMakita-Impact-GOLD-Assorted-2-1-2-in-Steel-Torx-Double-Ended-Power-Bits-3-Piece-B-49616%2F206284600

Robertson:

https://homedepot.sjv.io/c/1254293/456723/8154?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.homedepot.com%2Fp%2FMakita-Impact-GOLD-Assorted-2-1-2-in-Steel-Square-Double-Ended-Power-Bits-3-Piece-B-49600%2F206284599

Manufacturer messaging:

·      Engineered to last up to 60-times longer than standard insert bits

·      Precision-fit tip engineered to prevent “cam-out” stripping

·      Xtreme Torsion Technology is engineered to allow the torsion section of the bit to flex under load, taking pressure off the bit tip for increased durability in high torque applications

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.

Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Getting Crafty with the Dremel Stylo

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to more crafty-style projects, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

My first thought when I picked up this tool is that I wish I’d had it when I was a kid. I would have used the heck out of it. And though I’ve found it to be surprisingly useful in various endeavors while testing it, the thing I’m most excited about with this tool is the fact that I can feel comfortable and confident putting it in a child’s hands. That is not a veiled dig at the quality of the tool, it is something I’m genuinely excited about. It has enough power to be useful, but if it were to “bite,” the damage wouldn’t be devastating. It would be an ideal tool for working on derby cars, etching projects, and leather work. Speaking of leather, check out the awesome Wonder Woman cuff Katelyn (from one of my favorite YouTube Channels, Evan and Katelyn) made for me using the Stylo!

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The ergonomics of this tool are awesome- it feels like a pen and works like a pen, and thus, extended use isn’t really a concern. I used the Stylo quite a bit on my Damascus knife project (check out the video on YouTube to see it in action) to refine the Blackwood handle and copper ferrule and buffed/polished the whole knife as well.

 

Manufacturer claims:

·      Best for craft projects- glass etching, leather burnishing, jewelry making, wood etching and more

·      Slim size allows you to get closer to your workpiece and provides maximum control in precision etching, engraving, polishing and sanding applications

Awesome Features:

·      The overload switch that shuts the tool off instead of burning up the motor is awesome. I’ve burned up several rotary tools trying to push them beyond their limits, so knowing the tool isn’t going to explode in my hands is definitely a plus.

·      The ergonomics of this tool really are awesome- it’s easy to control and fine motor movement, even with a spinning tool out front is very achievable.

Things I wish were better/different:

·      The lock button and the power button are the same size and located in the same area (on opposite sides of the tool) so it’s easy to confuse them.

This tool retails for $59.00. Would I buy it?

The Stylo is not very well suited to the type of work I generally ask of my rotary tools, for that I’d be a lot more interested in a full size Dremel https://homedepot.sjv.io/c/1254293/456723/8154?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.homedepot.com%2Fp%2FDremel-4300-Series-1-8-Amp-Variable-Speed-Corded-Rotary-Tool-Kit-with-Mounted-Light-45-Accessories-and-Carrying-Case-4300-5-40%2F300589719 with the flexshaft attachment just to add a little versatility and power to the tool. https://homedepot.sjv.io/c/1254293/456723/8154?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.homedepot.com%2Fp%2FDremel-32-in-Flex-Shaft-Attachment-for-Rotary-Tools-225-01%2F100019434

That said, for light duty work where fine control is needed, this little tool is a good value for the money.

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.

Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Just call me MechANNE

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor or mechanic. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to construction and renovation, and vehicle and machine projects, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. That said, I doubt many professional contractors will be reading my tool reviews. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

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I have always loved tinkering with machines and motors. I spent a very good portion of my childhood trying to build the perfect go-kart. We were broke and I had no real understanding of how vehicles worked, so I never really got very far, but I spent untold thousands of hours taking lawn mowers apart, fiddling with wagons and bikes and scooters. My dad didn’t have many tools, but when I got to go to my Grandpa’s, I was in heaven- he had every tool known to man, and the knowhow to use them. He and I always talked about how we would one day restore an old truck together, and I’d drive it around doing farm chores on the farm I’d been dreaming about since I was five years old. By some miracle, today I have that farm and a shop with more tools than even Grandpa had. Sadly though, he didn’t live long enough to see it. Much of who I am and what I do today has a whole lot to do with my grandpa and his investment in my young life. So when I had the chance to buy a 1953 Chevy 3100 farm truck to restore in his honor, you better believe I jumped at the chance.

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A few years ago, I restored a 65 Mustang in my buddy’s shop, but I still barely know what I’m doing when it comes to working on my cars, machines and tractor. I spend a whole lot of time wishing I could just call up grandpa and ask him all my questions, but I spend a lot of time googling things and calling my friends instead. And as well equipped as my woodshop is, I’ve got some building up to do when it comes to my mechanical tools. 

I’ve been using a very similar Husky Mechanic’s set for the last 5 years. I’ve used that little set a LOT, probably a whole lot more than most homeowners would ever use a ratchet set, and still, found it to be more than enough for what I needed to assemble and perform basic maintenance on all my woodworking machines and equipment, work on my truck and tractor, repair my mowers and weedwhacker, tinker around on the mini-bike I built a couple years ago. 

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I’m no mechanic, but I use my mechanic’s tools more than your average homeowner. This set has a nice variety of tools, and while they aren’t Snap-On quality, Husky has a lifetime warranty and I’ve yet to need to replace any of mine. One really great thing about this particular set is the selection of Torx and Allen heads which you’ll find on a lot of small machines and can be very specialized. The set also has a spark plug socket, which my first Husky set did not, and seeing as I have to take the spark plug out of my lawn mower every single time I start it, it’s nice to have it right there.

Another thing to look out for with this set is that with the wide variety of deep sockets in this set, my first thought was pulling out my impact gun. These aren’t rated for impact use, and while the lifetime warranty might entice me to tempt fate, there is a remote danger that the heat buildup and strain of using these bits in an impact gun could cause them to explode, so just be aware of that.

The one thing I found to be really frustrating both on my old set of Husky tools and this one was the fact that the box they come in doesn’t keep the tools in their proper slots. When I first opened the box, the tools were everywhere, and, figuring they’d just gotten jostled in shipping, I put them back and closed the box. When I carried it outside to the truck and opened it again, the tools were once again scattered about inside. While this isn’t a reflection of the tools themselves, the most likely end-user for these tools is homeowners and contractors, both of whom would be very likely to want to store the tools in their original box for the lifetime of the set. I am a bit of a tool chest fanatic, so that won’t be a longterm frustration for me as I’ll be migrating the set to my chest, but it’s certainly something to be considered.

Manufacturer Messaging:

·      72 tooth quick release ratchet

·      includes 100 sockets, 67 accessories, 15 wrenches, 3 ratchets

·      Lifetime Warranty

Awesome Features:

·      More than adequate tool selection for a contractor or homeowner

·      Great selection of Torx

·      Spark plug socket

·      72 tooth ratchets make for more efficient turning in tight spaces

·      Good value for the money

Things I wish were better/different:

·      The original box doesn’t keep tools organized well

·      The indented area under the ratchet head is a collection point for grease and grime which could easily migrate into the ratcheting mechanism

This set retails for $149.00. Would I buy it?

 I doubt you’ll find this toolset in a mechanic’s tool chest, but this set is a good value and nice variety for the price with a lifetime warranty. I bought a very similar set from Husky five years ago and it has served me well.

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.

Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Let there be LIGHT!

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor or lighting expert. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker, and a budding photographer. When it comes to construction and renovation projects, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. When it comes to studio lighting, photography and videography, I’d call myself a mildly obsessed hobbiest. That said, I doubt many professional contractors or professional photographers or lighting experts will be reading my reviews. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- folks wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value possible for their hard earned dollars.

As a budding photographer, videographer, and massive night owl (who happens to be afraid of the dark), reviewing these lights was really fun.

First, let’s talk about the Ryobi light.

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The one thing I’ve always admired about Ryobi as a company is their dedication to backwards-compatible tools. Over the last few years, Ryobi has really stepped up their game in making quality tools at an affordable price point. And, though Ryobi has come leaps and bounds with battery development, new batteries pop right in old tools. Meanwhile, most other tool companies totally re-invent the wheel every few years when it comes to batteries, requiring an entire shop upgrade for every new battery system, which can get insanely expensive.

I am a little confused as to why Ryobi put the light temperature control feature on a jobsite tool. I do like the idea of warmer tones on the jobsite, but when lighting a job, I want the brightest light possible, and that will always be the cooler “daylight” settings, aka, the standard LED color emission characteristic of all other jobsite lights. Having done some gallery and event lighting, color adjustment is a great feature for gallery/event lights, but I wouldn’t likely be using a jobsite light in a gallery or event space, and certainly not a battery operated light.  That said, even if I weren’t reviewing it, I would still have purchased this light out of curiosity about color temperature adjustment for use with my photography and videography. Unfortunately, when filming using the cooler “daylight” settings, the light introduced severe interference (strobe effect) into the video footage, so, for me, that made the color temp control feature seem pretty pointless. 

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Ryobi’s main customer base is generally homeowners with light-moderate experience who expect light-moderate use from their tools. Knowing Milwaukee’s fame for holding up to contractor-style abuse, I decided to put the Ryobi light through some rigorous testing to see how it would hold up. We strapped it on the tractors and bailers on my buddy’s hay farm and used it for three weeks of night work. Aside from losing a screw somewhere in the hayfields, it provided plenty of light, had better than expected battery life, and saw several hundred bales of hay harvested. It held up well and certainly earned its keep on that project.

Manufacturer messaging for Ryobi:

·      Adjustable light color temperature from 2700K to 500K

·      Over 1200 Lumens of light output

·      360 degrees of rotation

Awesome Features of the Ryobi:

·      Backwards-compatible battery platform

·      Long battery life

·      Great flood capacity for night-lighting a jobsite

·      1/4/20 thread on stand makes it mountable on standard clamps and tripods

·      crosses in stand base allow for it to be easily hung on two screws off the wall, ceiling…

Things I wish were better/different on the Ryobi:

·      I wish the color temperature feature worked with filming

·      I wish the power cord could charge the battery while running the light

This light retails at $79.98 Would I buy it?

If I was already on the Ryobi battery platform I think it’s a great value for the money. Knowing that the temperature adjustment feature doesn’t work for what I’d use it for, I wouldn’t be likely to buy it.

Now, let's talk Milwaukee.

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I knew the Milwaukee light was a winner as soon as I turned it on. It’s ruggedly built, the metal hook on the bottom fits right into the recess under my truck hood giving perfect night illumination for my restoration work. The hook has also come in pretty handy using the light while camping hanging it from a branch, and hanging it from plant hooks for some midnight forging on the porch. The light earned some extra cool points when I accidentally left it out in a torrential rainstorm while camping and neither the light, nor the battery seemed affected. It’s unfortunate you can’t turn on both lights at once, and a similar frustration to the Ryobi is that the cord can’t charge the battery while the tool is in use.

Manufacturer messaging for Milwaukee:

·      2 lights in 1 for area lighting and task lighting

·      2,200 Lumen output for illuminating large work areas and 1000 Lumen of flood lighting for task situations

·      18 hours of run time with M18 5.0 battery and can be plugged into it’s AC inlet for extended run time

·      Equipped with a high impact polycarbonate lens to withstand harsh jobsite abuse.

·      LED lights never need to be replaced and are backed by a limited lifetime warranty

Awesome Features of the Milwaukee:

·      The metal hanger hook is my favorite feature of this light- it’s so versatile.

·      It’s bright enough to light a 10 foot diameter circle quite well.

·      It’s compact enough to take to the jobsite or camping

·      Milwaukee’s new battery system is incredible both in power delivery and battery life.

Things I wish were better/different on the Milwaukee:

·      I wish you could run both lights at once

·      It’s a bummer that the cord can’t charge the battery while powering the light.

This light retails at $149.00. Would I buy it?

Absolutely. It gives jobsite-level light from an old time-y lantern feel.

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.
Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

Makita Battery Powered Vacuum

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional house cleaner.

While cleanliness and organization are extremely important to me, this year, working 18 hour days most of the time, I can barely keep my bed made and my laundry folded, much less keep the farm mess outside the house where it belongs. I track in woodchips and sawdust all day from the shop, the garden, and the barn (we are very fond of wood chips around here). Despite our valiantly half-hearted attempts to keep her off the furniture, Abbey Puppy has decided she is a cat, and frolics from couch to couch dropping little black hairs and farm dust everywhere she goes. There are kids around the farm all the time, they bring their own special tornadoes of filth along with them, and don’t even get me STARTED on what happens when Howdy comes inside the house. Needless to say, it’s tough to keep this place clean. Sweeping seems futile, and it always seems like so much work to find one of the only two plugs (SERIOUSLY, what was this home builder thinking?) in the main area of the house to plug in our little yellow vacuum to clean up.

This already feels like an infomercial (did you read that whole upper section in sepia tones?), but I cannot tell you how great it is to have a battery powered vacuum in the house. It hangs out in the kitchen and I grab it for a quick tidy several times a day. I’ll be honest and say I’d probably have pretty similar reactions of pure joy with any battery powered vacuum, BUT, the real appreciation for the Makita came for me after I’d gifted one to my dad for Father’s day.

To say my dad is a CleanFreak is a massive understatement. I kid you not, he vacuums his place on the couch before he sits on it. He’s probably had 10 battery powered vacuums over the last ten years, always the first to jump on any new design available, so I was very pleased to beat him to this punch, and even more pleased to hear his glowing review of my gift:

“Easy to use, lightweight and very flexible for tight spots and under hard-to-reach back walls. Perfect fit for gliding under furniture with an extension and reach to a back wall. Ample space for dirt and dust collection. Easy cleaning of the filter and dust bin. And enough battery to clean a 1200sq ft house with battery power to spare. Quick recharge time, and all in all, a great vacuum for your money that won’t clean out your wallet!”
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As I mentioned, I use mine around the house on a daily basis. The fact that it has it’s own charger was a huge plus in that, because it’s a tad too light duty for the shop, but seeing as I’m running mostly Makita tools in my shop, I didn’t want to lose a charger out there for a household item. I love that I can use my other 18v Makita batteries in it and it’s super easy to clean out when the bin is full. It is light-duty as far as suction and bin go, but that hasn’t been an issue in using it around the house because it’s so easy to use I find myself using it so frequently that there isn’t any buildup that would require a heavier duty machine. It sweeps the wood floors great, navigates well under and around furniture, and then I can easily pull off the floor attachment and use it to get all the dog hair and dust off the couches. Since I’m in charge of running the farm and my husband does most of the household chores, he’s also really enjoyed the fact that I’ve got a new toy to play with that’s encouraged me to help him out with some of his chores too.

And, when it comes to the tiny house, there’s no power out there, so I’ve used this vacuum several times to clean up little messes out there as well. It worked a treat sucking up the debris out of the reclaimed door and windows we installed and sucked up all the dust and dirt off the floor and out of all the crevices when we were ready to take our final beauty shots of our progress on the build before April went back to Texas.

Manufacturer messaging:

·      Up to 15 minutes of continuous use from a single fully charged 18-Volt compact Lithium-ion 2.0AH battery

·      Use hand vac or with attachment for floor vac

·      Powerful suction for only 7 lbs

Awesome Features:

·      Easy cleanout when it’s full

·      Extremely navigate-able in hard-to-reach areas

·      It’s Makita- a shop tool I can play with in the house!

·      It has it’s own dedicated charger, but is still compatible with my other Makita batteries

Things I wish were better/different:

·      I’d like it to come with a 5.0AH hour battery, but understand that it would add to both the weight and the cost of the tool.

This tool retails at $99.00 Would I buy it?

Yup! I use mine so much I gave one to my dad for Father’s day and he loves it.

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.
Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.

True Blue Digital Box Level

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This review was created as part of a paid affiliate program with the Home Depot.

My first order of business with this and every product review is a disclaimer: I am not a professional contractor. I am a farmer and a fine furniture maker. When it comes to construction and renovation projects, I’m a DIYer and weekend warrior. That said, I doubt many professional contractors will be reading my tool reviews. My goal in reviewing tools and products is to provide honest feedback based on my own use and experience with these tools to other regular folks like me- wanting to get their hands dirty, try new things, and get the best value for their hard earned dollars.

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The more time I’ve spent in the shop the last few years, the better I’ve become at seeing “square.” In that same vein, the more things being out of square has started to bother me and thus, I’ve started to use levels more and more. A few years ago, I’d have grabbed a driver and some screws and hung a handful of pictures by eye. Now, I can see if one picture is 1/8” higher than it’s neighbor, and it drives me nuts. Outside of picture hanging though, (a task for which my laser level has made the use of a bubble level unnecessary) and the odd cabinetry job, I don’t see much use for a short (this one is 16”) level. That said though, this little gizmo has some cool features which made it easier for me to think of excuses to use it.

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First, the audible “level” indicator is awesome. If you’ve got your hands full of stuff and are working on a ladder or at a weird angle and can’t see the readout or the bubble, that is a pretty fantastic feature. April and I used the level when hanging the windows in the Tiny House, and that feature alone made the job a cakewalk.

Some things to consider: As a construction tool in Seattle, this would be pretty likely to get wet. Rain and electric components aren’t generally a great match, so I’ll be interested to see how this holds up through some of my winter construction projects. Because the digital components have no true zero, which do you trust, the bubble or the readout? A perfectionist could drive themself crazy trying not only to get the two to match up perfectly, but also, there are very few instances (at least in my builds) when bubble-centered-accuracy isn’t enough. And with all that said, while this level proved to be incredibly accurate in my tests, it’s not a Starrett or Mitoya, and I doubt the average end-user of this tool, homeowners, need that kind of precision in anything they do.

Manufacturer highlights:

·      Precision milled edges- guarantees 0.0005 in accuracy

·      Dual Backlit digital display- industry’s largest display

·      Audio Indicator with 7 measuring modes

Awesome Features:

·      Audible “level” indicator is awesome

·      The digital readouts really are big easy to read, and the fact that they light up so you can see them in the dark or shadows is also a really great feature.

·      This is both a plus and a minus- it’s so accurate, it’s tempting to get lost in the minutia. How level is level “enough?”

Things I wish were better/different:

·      I wish the readouts were centered on the tool.

·      I’d like to see a vertical bubble just for a rough reference.

·      On a short level like this one, a laser feature would be pretty cool, but then again, I may just be too obsessed with lasers for my own good.

This tool retails at $99.00. Would I buy it?

After using a laser level the last few months, the only time I need a bubble level is when the sun is too bright to see the lasers… so maybe I just need brighter lasers? In all seriousness though, if I were to buy this tool, I’d buy a longer one for longer registering surface and accuracy.

*I acknowledge that the Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the Prospective 2018 Campaign. As part of the program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines.

 

Posted on July 27, 2018 and filed under Tool Reviews.